Psychological Safety London Workshop

Eskil's psychological safety London workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours


Psychological Safety & Communications Skills  – December 7, 2019
Kimpton Fitzroy London Hotel
1-8 Russell Square
Bloomsbury
London
WC1B 5BE

 


Eskil’s psychological safety London workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours.

Whether in the workplace or in society, great communication skills are essential.  How well do you transmit and receive information?

Regardless of what you are doing – whether it’s with family, friends, or colleagues – we need to be able to communicate.

To achieve anything meaningful, we go further and faster when we work together.

A sense of psychological safety is critical: to have the ability to speak our mind and know that we will be listened to – to know that our opinions are as valid as anyone else’s.

In the workplace, the emphasis on collaboration, consensus, ethics, openness and more all rely on the psychological safety that we all feel.

Likewise, in the social context, we want to feel the same kind of psychological safety within our friends and family.

There are direct links between psychological safety and a person’s happiness and productivity – and so here is a half-day workshop to cover one of the key elements of this: developing our communications skills.

In this four-hour session we will:

  • Explore the benefits of psychological safety in the workplace and home
  • Look at what interferes with the receipt and transmission of information
  • Practice the art of the conversation to build rapport, empathy, and trust
  • Consider how to build a relationship with someone with different opinions

 

Due to the popularity of this workshop, there are limited tickets available.


Our Contact Information

To contact us: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Psychological Safety Stratford Workshop

Eskil's psychological safety stratford workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours


Psychological Safety & Communications Skills  – December 6, 2019
Alderminster
Stratford-upon-Avon
Warwickshire
CV37 8BU

 


Eskil’s psychological safety Stratford-on-Avon workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours.

Whether in the workplace or in society, great communication skills are essential.  How well do you transmit and receive information?

Regardless of what you are doing – whether it’s with family, friends, or colleagues – we need to be able to communicate.

To achieve anything meaningful, we go further and faster when we work together.

A sense of psychological safety is critical: to have the ability to speak our mind and know that we will be listened to – to know that our opinions are as valid as anyone else’s.

In the workplace, the emphasis on collaboration, consensus, ethics, openness and more all rely on the psychological safety that we all feel.

Likewise, in the social context, we want to feel the same kind of psychological safety within our friends and family.

There are direct links between psychological safety and a person’s happiness and productivity – and so here is a half-day workshop to cover one of the key elements of this: developing our communications skills.

In this four-hour session we will:

  • Explore the benefits of psychological safety in the workplace and home
  • Look at what interferes with the receipt and transmission of information
  • Practice the art of the conversation to build rapport, empathy, and trust
  • Consider how to build a relationship with someone with different opinions

 

Due to the popularity of this workshop, there are limited tickets available.


Our Contact Information

To contact us: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Psychological Safety Birmingham Workshop

Eskil's psychological safety birmingham workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours


Psychological Safety & Communications Skills  – December 5, 2019
Innovation Birmingham
Holt Street
Birmingham
B7 4BB

 


Eskil’s psychological safety Birmingham workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours.

Whether in the workplace or in society, great communication skills are essential.  How well do you transmit and receive information?

Regardless of what you are doing – whether it’s with family, friends, or colleagues – we need to be able to communicate.

To achieve anything meaningful, we go further and faster when we work together.

A sense of psychological safety is critical: to have the ability to speak our mind and know that we will be listened to – to know that our opinions are as valid as anyone else’s.

In the workplace, the emphasis on collaboration, consensus, ethics, openness and more all rely on the psychological safety that we all feel.

Likewise, in the social context, we want to feel the same kind of psychological safety within our friends and family.

There are direct links between psychological safety and a person’s happiness and productivity – and so here is a half-day workshop to cover one of the key elements of this: developing our communications skills.

In this four-hour session we will:

  • Explore the benefits of psychological safety in the workplace and home
  • Look at what interferes with the receipt and transmission of information
  • Practice the art of the conversation to build rapport, empathy, and trust
  • Consider how to build a relationship with someone with different opinions

 

Due to the popularity of this workshop, there are limited tickets available.


Our Contact Information

To contact us: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Psychological Safety Warwickshire Workshop

Eskil's psychological safety warwickshire workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours


Psychological Safety & Communications Skills  – December 4, 2019
Ashorne Hill
Leamington Spa
Warwickshire
CV33 9QW

 


Eskil’s psychological safety Warwickshire workshop includes psychology, communications skills and behaviours.

Whether in the workplace or in society, great communication skills are essential.  How well do you transmit and receive information?

Regardless of what you are doing – whether it’s with family, friends, or colleagues – we need to be able to communicate.

To achieve anything meaningful, we go further and faster when we work together.

A sense of psychological safety is critical: to have the ability to speak our mind and know that we will be listened to – to know that our opinions are as valid as anyone else’s.

In the workplace, the emphasis on collaboration, consensus, ethics, openness and more all rely on the psychological safety that we all feel.

Likewise, in the social context, we want to feel the same kind of psychological safety within our friends and family.

There are direct links between psychological safety and a person’s happiness and productivity – and so here is a half-day workshop to cover one of the key elements of this: developing our communications skills.

In this four-hour session we will:

  • Explore the benefits of psychological safety in the workplace and home
  • Look at what interferes with the receipt and transmission of information
  • Practice the art of the conversation to build rapport, empathy, and trust
  • Consider how to build a relationship with someone with different opinions

 

Due to the popularity of this workshop, there are limited tickets available.


Our Contact Information

To contact us: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Workplace Psychological Safety

"Eskil

Workplace Psychological Safety

In a time of the knowledge economy, Amy Edmonson’s book, “The Fearless Organization” talks about how “getting along” and “fitting in” can be the death of an enterprise.  Workplace Psychological Safety is a product and an enabler of Facilitative Leadership.

If you work in a business environment you will have, in all likelihood, been in meetings.  How many times have people sat quietly, offering no opinion?  Maybe you’ve been part of a group of people agreeing with whatever the most senior person in the room says.

Contact us to speak about Psychological Safety.

The infection of Impression Management

Impression Management is a long-established recognition of how we consciously and subconsciously try to influence the perceptions others.  The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life by Erving Goffman in 1959 outlining how impression management is usually used synonymously with self-presentation.

Fast-forward to the 21st century and we see impression management as one of the most predominant activities of our age.  

Consider the effort put into a Facebook post, LinkedIn update or Instagram Story.  We can see how impression management can seed itself into our worklives.

When we couple this with such factors as economic cycles (recession) and automation (AI) we see how people are fighting for jobs and using how they present themselves as part of their armoury.

This means that we won’t rock the boat and we won’t want to stand out by being too different.  This reticence sums up psychological safety in the workplace.

Facilitative Leadership & Workplace Psychological Safety

In a 2019 article in Harvard Business Review, there is reference to a McKinsey survey where 94% of executives are dissatisfied with their firms’ innovation performance.

To catalyse innovation, companies have invested billions in internal venture capital, incubators, accelerators, and field trips to Silicon Valley.  So what’s going wrong?

Workplace psychological safety is the ‘relationships’ aspect of leadership: the shared belief that the team is safe for interpersonal risk taking. In psychologically safe teams, team members feel accepted and respected – and so they willingly contribute.

Contact us to speak about Facilitative Leadership and Psychological Safety.

The psychological benefits of Workplace Psychological Safety

Mental wellbeing is a core aspect of psychological safety.  We realise corporate results and personal wins through the right kind of empowering culture.  Psychological Safety gives us an environment for people to reduce their internal tension / stress; feel valued; have open and honest discussions; be able to say ‘no’ without fear of retribution.

The corporate wins

We know that, for an organisation to embrace any kind of initiative, there has to be a business case.  A number of studies show that psychological safety is a mediator of relationships (including organizational context, team characteristics and team leadership) and outcomes.

These outcomes include:

      • innovation (more group-think to build innovation)
      • performance improvement
      • learning (increase in the amount that members learn from mistakes)
      • team cohesion (boosting employee engagement)
      • conflict management
      • acceptance of change (greater engagement at all levels of the change process)

Psychological Safety & The Team

While empathy and trust are elements that help with building psychological safety, psychological safety is about team relationships whereas empathy and trust operate at the individual levels.

Facilitative Leadership is all about drawing out and sharing information across the enterprise.  This means that the Facilitative Leader enables teams and organisations to learn and perform. Whilst we individually feel psychologically safe, the Facilitative Leader builds it for the team level.

As an example, our level of psychological safety determines how likely we are to express a new or different idea.

Contact us to speak about Psychological Safety and your teams.

Leader Language

We associate psychological safety with role clarity, peer support, and context.  This comes from clear expectations; colleague encouragement; knowing why you are doing what you are doing.

The leadership in an organisation has a responsibility to cultivate Workplace Psychological Safety.  Concurrent to this, the culture is developing ‘bottom-up’.  This is articulated in Neil Fogarty’s work in Leader Language : LLQi® where interpersonal communications are the building blocks for psychological safety.

Cultivating Workplace Psychological Safety

Leader Language : LLQi applies to all colleagues and can be used to build psychological safety:

      • Approach every conversation as a learning-point.  You learn more from being wrong;
      • Remove adversarial engagements.  Discussion isn’t about winning and losing: it’s about co-creating new understanding and new ways forward;
      • Look below-the-line. Beliefs, values, opinions, etc all lie below the words being said.  Such elements serve to determine what is said and how it is communicated.  The transition from below to above-the-line is filtered; what is articulated in a conversation isn’t usually the whole story;
      • Recognize and acknowledge opposing values.  There is no obligation to agree; just see other points of view;
      • Maintain your interested.  Always ask questions as you seek to understand.  Be sure to balance curiosity against interrogation: curiosity builds knowledge but interrogation builds barriers;
      • Encourage critique.  Make feedback and critique your friend as this is what can challenge your thinking and help form new opinions / ideas;
      • Focus on evidence over opinion.  We only need to see the conflicts attached with such political situations as the election of Donald Trump or Brexit to see how opinion without fact is destructive.  Arguing opinion with opinion is unhelpful;

If you create this sense of psychological safety in a viral style (e.g. 1-2-4-all where you grow construct conversations organically), you will see growth in empathy, rapport, trust, cohesion and performance.

Contact us to speak about cultivating Psychological Safety.


If you are interesting in the building blocks of Workplace Psychological Safety

Contact: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Facilitative Leadership

A large part of our work is in psychological safety and its natural progression into Facilitative Leadership.  What we see with Facilitative Leadership is the creation of an people-centred environment where the leader manages the process of dialogue.

As an organisation built around Associates & Partners, Eskil has grown through Facilitative Leadership.  We have invested time in collaboration, information exchange and engagement.

In addition to this, as a sales-driven entity, we apply the same person-centred approach where we consult heavily with client stakeholders.

Facilitative Leadership

Facilitative leadership is a balance of achieving results through effective processes, underpinned by relationships.

Eskil’s key service is in the field of ‘relationships’ – the psychology, communications and behaviours that come under ‘psychological safety’.

Facilitative Leadership creates and supports a positive culture (the sense of psychological safety).

While there is still an imperative to ‘lead’, it is more collaborative and collegiate.  There is no driving need for the Leader to know everything but, instead, to capture knowledge from the collective.  Whether this is in a one-one meeting or a group session, the Facilitative Leader designs and manages the information-sharing process.

Click here to speak to us about facilitative leadership.

Psychology of Facilitative Leadership

Nurturing the positive work environment

There are causal links between psychological safety and productivity & innovation.  The Facilitative Leader is responsible for engendering a culture where people feel comfortable in how they act and speak.

Believes in adulthood

In terms of Transactional Analysis, Eric Berne outlines the concept of adult-adult interactions.  Within this, the Facilitative Leader is looking for people who are non-directional, non-judgemental, open-minded and supportive.  The Facilitative Leader, however, isn’t looking for ‘nurturing parents’ but people who can manage the process of honest collaboration.

Looks ‘below-the-line’

Above-the-line communication is the evident words and actions of all involved.  What lies below this line are values, beliefs, experiences, prejudices, mindset and more.  The Facilitative Leader creates an environment where the line lowers – and people can be honest about how they feel and what they think.

Click here to speak to us about leader psychology.

Communications of the Facilitative Leader

Encourages disagreement 

The Facilitative Leader doesn’t expect every conversation to go their way.  Likewise, they advocate the maxim, “the answer is in the room” – losing leader ego and encouraging dissent helps to build a stronger enterprise.

Encourages the equal voice

Statistically, the majority of people within a senior meeting will be the analysts.  When you consider the need for information and data to support decision-making, this shouldn’t be too much of a shock.  But what about creative thinkers, the people-people, and the people who deliver?  Or the introverts / ambiverts?  Or those who are new to the business and just finding their feet?  All too often, the problem is defined (uncontested) by the person in the leadership role.  Likewise, this person has probably already decided on the solution.  The Facilitative Leader doesn’t have any of these answers and encourages input from all (and limits those with excessive opinions).

Click here to speak to us about leader communications.

Behaviours of Facilitative Leadership

Manages the resistance to change

When people are involved in identifying, articulating and driving change, the resistance to it decreases.  People who feel that they are being dictated to will have a natural inclination to push back.  When people feel like they are in control of their destiny, their engagement increases.

Gives up control

All too often, people in leadership roles just can’t let go.  When colleagues have defined a problem, sourced potential solutions, and agreed a way forward, the Facilitative Leader lets them get on with it.  This isn’t to say that the Facilitative Leader isn’t interested: there is more of an acceptance of the maturity and responsibility of the team.

Seeks to raise the capability of everyone, not just the chosen few

Every interaction is a chance to learn something new.  The Facilitative Leader recognises that their job can be so much easier if the capability levels of all employees collectively rise by the smallest percent.

Addresses destructive conflict; encourages positive conflict

Facilitative Leadership is dialogic – verbal and written conversations are crucial to relationship-building.  This leads to continual discussion and exposure to a myriad of opinions.  The Facilitative Leader wants to get below-the-line as a way to build rapport but, in doing so can reveal conflict points.  The Facilitative Leader exposes negative conflict and dismantles it whilst, in the process, encourages positive conflict.

Click here to speak to us about leader behaviours.


Nine traits of the Facilitative Leader

As you would expect, a Facilitative Leader is balancing two traits: facilitation and leadership.  There are some touch-points while the primary difference to the purist is that leaders lead but facilitators stand to the side.

In Facilitative Leadership, the person in the leadership role choses not to lead but to guide.

So, what do we look for in a leader to create and develop the psychological safety for people to feel safe in contributing?

    1. Clarity – someone able to break down complexity into a common language so that it is clear for everyone in the room;
    2. Natural empathy – connecting with people through verbal and physical positive ‘strokes’ that encourage people to expand upon their thinking;  demonstrating compassion and an understanding points of view;
    3. Evidence-based  – encouraging people to rely less on opinion and more on evidence;
    4. Balanced communicator – speaking less, listening more; giving everyone a voice in the room;
    5. Attentive listener – avoiding paraphrasing and summarising but, instead, encouraging more questions to build understanding – putting other people at the centre of the conversation;
    6. Seeks out opportunities to be wrong – not looking to be the star turn or the office guru but, instead, deferring to others and being happy to be proved wrong in the process;
    7. High enthusiasm – Facilitative Leadership is an ongoing activity that calls for energy and enthusiasm as colleague capability and engagement increases;
    8. Trusts and be trusted – people follow those who are trustworthy and the Facilitative Leader needs to equally trust those around them;
    9. Links to the corporate objective – when all is said and done, the Facilitative Leader has an overarching ambition that the enterprise is being oriented into achieving

If you are interesting in the building blocks of Facilitative Leadership

Contact: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Building Psychological Safety


How many times have we seen the quote about people not leaving bad companies but leaving bad bosses?  This LinkedIn-friendly meme is a pain-in-the-ass oversimplifying something bigger than ‘the boss’.   Eskil focuses on building psychological safety at the corporate, departmental, team and individual levels.  What this means is that we see the root causes of much that ails an organisation.

The 2015 quote by Steve Gruenert and Todd Whitaker in 2015 explains the problem a lot better.

The Culture of any organization is shaped by the worst behavior the leader is willing to tolerate.

Novartis Professor of Leadership at Harvard Business School, Amy C. Edmondson is the author of the book The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth. She defines “psychological safety” as “a climate in which people are comfortable being (and expressing) themselves.”

There are many issues that result from poor psychological safety.  Referring back to the quote above, poor psychological safety is a reflection of what leadership is willing to tolerate.

By building psychological safety, leaders are building new cultures.  We empower everyone to think and act in an adult, non-directional, non-judgemental way.

Gallup’s 2017 “State of the American Workplace Report” revealed that only 30% of U.S. workers strongly agreed that, at work, their opinions seemed to count.  However, improving this figure has direct correlation to a reduction in turnover, safety incidents and an increase in productivity.

In the 2017 “report of the Office of the Ombudsman for Mental Health (the Office) of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)“, the Ombudsman found:

  • 70% of Canadian employees are concerned about workplace psychological health and safety
  • 14% of Canadian employees feel that their work environment is not healthy or safe
  • 60% of Canadian employees with a mental health problem or illness won’t seek help for fear of being labeled

It went on to outline how some behaviours can lead to or aggravate an existing mental health issue, such as:

  • A lack of communication, trust and empathy, primarily in the employee-employer relationship
  • A lack of courtesy and respect, primarily in the employee-employer relationship

Building Psychological Safety

In our work in facilitative leadership, we focus heavily on ‘relationships’ – empowering and enabling individuals to build a new culture.

If you are interested in developing the mental wellbeing of your employees then you need to consider the culture and leadership that is driving this.  Contact us to discuss ways to build your psychological safety framework.


Our Contact Information

To contact us: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

 

Communication Skills For Psychological Safety

Eskil works extensively in psychology, communications & behaviours - this is a London Workshop about psychological safety

Speaking up at work can be difficult and this can be a result of a culture that stops us from communicating.  We worry what colleagues will say (and what our boss will think).  By fostering psychological safety, all employees can feel safe to speak up.

One of our primary areas of interest is psychological safety in the workplace.  Our work in this field covers psychology, communications, and behaviours.

Regardless of what you are doing – whether it’s with family, friends, or colleagues – we need to be able to communicate.

To achieve anything meaningful, we go further and faster when we collaborate.

A sense of psychological safety is critical.  We want to be able to speak our mind and to know that we will be listened to.  In doing so, we want to see that our opinions are as valid as anyone else’s.

In the workplace, so much relies on psychological safety.  We see causal links between this sense of safety and innovation, productivity, acceptance of change, and more.

Likewise, in the social context, we want to feel the same kind of psychological safety within our friends and family.

There are direct links between psychological safety and a person’s happiness and productivity.  Here is a half-day workshop to cover one of the key elements of this: how we communicate.

Practical & Applicable

In this four-hour session we will:

  • Explore the benefits of psychological safety in the workplace and home
  • Look at what’s ‘below-the-line’ – what interferes with the receipt of information
  • Practice the art of the conversation to build rapport, empathy, and trust
  • Consider how to build a relationship with someone with different opinions

This half-day is a fantastic introduction to building a stronger culture within a team or the wider organisation.

Check the flyer here or Book your ticket here.


Contact Information

Contact: Click here & send a message
Tel.: +44.7592.350.945
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Applied Business Psychology

Eskil delivers Middle East Training in Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, UAE, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia - this includes over 100 facilitation activities and serious games including applied business psychology, communications, behaviours


At Eskil, we use applied business psychology, communications and behaviours as the foundation to much of our facilitative leadership work.  We make use of recognised tools, methods and approaches to create meaningful learning & development.

Using Applied Business Psychology as a foundation to our short courses and programs, Eskil is an agnostic educator – we use whatever tools, methods and approaches work best to deliver superior results for our delegates.

This means that we have access to an array of psychology and technology tools that make our offering truly unique.

Members of our team are certified to work with such tools as Emotional Intelligence, MLQ 5X, ALQ, LEQ, and ODQ.

As pre-work to any of our learning & development interventions, participants are invited to complete assessments in such areas as

  • ECR Emotional Intelligence
  • MLQ 5X leadership types
  • ALQ authentic leadership
  • LEQ leader’s efficacy
  • ODQ organizational description
  • POIS organizational influence strategies
  • State-Trait anxiety inventory

Additionally, we refer to Leader Language : LLQi®, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Time Line Therapy (TLT) and Mindfulness in our short courses and programs.


To organise a discussion regarding Middle East training:

Contact: Elias Fikany
Cell: +961 70 104 265
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Click here for a general enquiry.

Training ROI

Eskil delivers Middle East Training in Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, UAE, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia - this includes helping to show a training ROI


Eskil’s commitment to Learning & Development including seeking out the Training ROI – the return on your investment into education.

Our six-step approach to facilitating your learning & development intervention uses a blend of approaches with a focus on putting the stakeholders at the center of the whole experience.

This includes showing a return and our preparation, delivery and follow-up approaches all serve to ensure that you realize an ROI.

Every Eskil employee has been on the other side – we have received training, sat in workshops, attended higher and / or further education. We know what it takes to get the best of your learning.

Simply, meeting us at a venue for learning & development is not the total solution.  To ensure that you secure a measurable ROI on your executive learning, our approach to a workshop includes:

Before the event

  • Consultation with key stakeholders to understand the context of the intervention;
  • Planning out an agenda for the intervention that aligns with timing and participant requirements and has a good agenda ‘flow’;
  • Agreeing with key stakeholders to ensure that the learning outcomes from the session align to the corporate ambition;
  • Assessment & selection of a suitable venue for the session;
  • Room(s) set out to accommodate any specific participant requirements;
  • Participants invited to complete individual and / or 360-degree psychology assessments;
  • Option for provision of preparatory resources (PDF and Video)

During the event

  • Assigning one facilitator for every fourteen delegates;
  • Delivered in Arabic and / or English;
  • Option for women-only events;
  • Designed for different personalities and psychologies
  • Accessing business theories including Six Hats, Transactional Analysis, Holacracy, Blue Ocean Strategy, etc.;
  • Blend of discussion and activities – we do not deliver lectures;
  • Regular breaks;
  • Option for an outstanding delegate pack including branded workbooks

After the event

  • Post-event mentoring specific to the material covered;
  • Virtual classrooms for alumni
  • Feedback on the experience passed to our Quality Manager
  • Follow-up resources including further PDFs and Videos
  • Internal Verification of the outcomes of the event to validate the success of the facilitator

There is an advantage to investing in learning.


To organise a discussion regarding Middle East training:

Contact: Elias Fikany
Cell: +961 70 104 265
Email: [email protected]
Website: eskil.co

Click here for a general enquiry.